Resources

Lots of resources about different elements of healthy ageing are available on the internet and in print.

Below you can find a selection of key resources about healthy ageing. You can use the menu on the left to filter resources on document type.

Resources

Ageing Report (2009) - Economic and budgetary projections for the EU-27 Member States (2008-2060)

This publication details long-term economic and budgetary projections aimed at assessing the impact of Europe's ageing population. It aims to enhance comparability of data across countries and the economic basis for the underlying assumptions.

It is structured in two parts. The first describes the assumptions underlying the population projection, the labour force projection and the other macro-economic assumptions. The second part presents the projection of expenditure on pensions, health care, long-term care, education and unemployment transfers. A statistical annex gives a country-by-country overview of the main assumptions and results.

The report is provided by DG ECFIN and can be downloaded here.

Age Platform - Lifelong Learning: A Tool for All Ages

Age Platform's statement for the 2007 European Year of Equal Opportunities for All.

Action for Ageing

Book written by Chris Minett & Robin Minett, containing 297 tips to improve health, safety and well-being. Information and tips available at the Action for Ageing website.

European Centre - Active Ageing and Prevention in the Context of Long-Term Care Rethinking Concepts and Practices

Policy brief produced by European Centre, outlining trends in Europe, success and problem areas of long-term care provision, and policy recommendations.

FUTURAGE - A Road Map for European Ageing Research

Lays out a research agenda on ageing research for the European Union.

Healthy Ageing - A Challenge for Europe (Short Version)

Approximately one third of Europe's population will be aged 60 and over by 2025, with a particularly significant increase in the number of people aged 80 and over. This will have an enormous impact on European societies.

This was why in 2003 the Swedish National Institute of Public Health, with the support of the European Commission and 12 partners including the World Health Organization, European Older People's Platform (AGE), EuroHealthNet and concerned stakeholders initiated the 'Healthy Ageing ' project under the European Union Public Health Programme.

The aims of this publication are to:

  • review and analyse existing data on health and ageing;
  • make recommendations for policy at EU and member state levels;
  • disseminate the findings and facilitate implementation.
EuroHealthNet - Making the Link: Healthy Ageing and Health Equity

Policy Précis on healthy ageing produced by EuroHealthNet.

European Policy Centre - Active and Healthy Ageing: Can the EU Deliver?

Policy Briefing produced by the European Policy Centre.

Healthy Ageing - A Challenge for Europe (Long Version)

Approximately one third of Europe's population will be aged 60 and over by 2025, with a particularly significant increase in the number of people aged 80 and over. This will have an enormous impact on European societies.

This was why in 2003 the Swedish National Institute of Public Health, with the support of the European Commission and 12 partners including the World Health Organization, European Older People's Platform (AGE), EuroHealthNet and concerned stakeholders initiated the 'Healthy Ageing ' project under the European Union Public Health Programme.

The aims of this publication are to:

  • review and analyse existing data on health and ageing;
  • make recommendations for policy at EU and member state levels;
  • disseminate the findings and facilitate implementation.
World Health Organization - Global Age-friendly Cities: A Guide

Population ageing and urbanisation are two global trends that together comprise major forces shaping the 21st century. At the same time as cities are growing, their share of residents aged 60 years and more is increasing. Older people are a resource for their families, communities and economies in supportive and enabling living environments.

An age-friendly city encourages active ageing by optimising opportunities for health, participation and security in order to enhance quality of life as people age.

Informed by WHO's approach to active ageing, the purpose of this publication aims to help cities to become more age-friendly, so as to tap the potential that older people represent for humanity.

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